Transceiver control of LightwaveRF devices

LightwaveRF Communi… > Forum > LightwaveRF Hackers > Transceiver control…

LightwaveRF Community: Welcome Forums LightwaveRF Hackers Transceiver control of LightwaveRF devices

This topic contains 6 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Irishcream24 1 month ago.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #24253
     Irishcream24 says:

    Irishcream24
    Participant

    Hi All,

    I am sorry if this question has been asked and answered before. I am in the process of building a home automation hub with arduino connected to 433MHz transmitters and receivers (the simple ones you can buy on eBay). I have managed to get this to control plugs using cheap RF wall socket switches, LightwareRF light switches, and I have also built my own boiler controller. What I would really love is to use a 433 MHz transceiver for the hub. I think I can get most things to work with a transceiver (using the arduino Radiohead library), but I am finding it difficult to see if anyone has had luck using a 433MHz transceiver to control LightwareRF devices (e.g. Is there an arduino library out there to control a transceiver, which ever one people have had success with, which can then control LightwaveRF devices)?

    Looking forward to people’s input.

    Many thanks

    Irishcream24

    P.S. if there is currently no arduino library out there to control LightwaveRF devices via a transceiver, would anyone want to work together to create one?

    #24260
     btidey says:

    btidey
    Participant

    https://github.com/roberttidey/LightwaveRF

    This has libraries that can be used on arduino, particle and raspberry pi

    #24268
     Irishcream24 says:

    Irishcream24
    Participant

    https://github.com/roberttidey/LightwaveRF

    This has libraries that can be used on arduino, particle and raspberry pi

    Thanks for the message btidey. I have already looked at this library and I don’t feel it can work with transceivers. I am happy to be corrected though.

    #24276
     btidey says:

    btidey
    Participant

    There is a library for a receiver and a library for a transmitter. They can be used together. I have projects where they are used in combination to receive one 433MHz protocol and transmit on another.

    If you mean a specific transceiver chip rather than a receiver/transmitter pair then you need to specify what chip you are talking about.

    #24289
     Irishcream24 says:

    Irishcream24
    Participant

    There is a library for a receiver and a library for a transmitter. They can be used together. I have projects where they are used in combination to receive one 433MHz protocol and transmit on another.

    If you mean a specific transceiver chip rather than a receiver/transmitter pair then you need to specify what chip you are talking about.

    I was thinking of a transceiver (e.g. combined transceiver and receiver in one microchip). There are several out there, so I don’t mind what ever people have had success with. I am currently interested in the RFM22B transceiver from HopeRF (awaiting delivery of this).

    #24299
     btidey says:

    btidey
    Participant

    Those transceivers are complicated. They have an SPI interface and can support all sorts of modulation schemes.

    So they are good for setting up nodes where you have control over both ends as in the Arduino library that supports them. They are not so good for emulating proprietary protocols like Lightwaverf.

    It may be possible to use them for transmission (using direct OOK mode) nut I think reception of arbitrary data will be problematic as they expect to recover a clock from the incoming data.

    I would still use the simple modules as they give raw access to the data which is what is needed. The receivers that use superhet have better range than the regenerative ones.

    #24317
     Irishcream24 says:

    Irishcream24
    Participant

    Those transceivers are complicated. They have an SPI interface and can support all sorts of modulation schemes.

    So they are good for setting up nodes where you have control over both ends as in the Arduino library that supports them. They are not so good for emulating proprietary protocols like Lightwaverf.

    It may be possible to use them for transmission (using direct OOK mode) nut I think reception of arbitrary data will be problematic as they expect to recover a clock from the incoming data.

    I would still use the simple modules as they give raw access to the data which is what is needed. The receivers that use superhet have better range than the regenerative ones.

    ok, well I am still going to try to make a transceiver that can control LightwaveRF modules. Will let you all know the results.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.