Switched fused spur

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  robhurd 3 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #12990
     geoffpreston says:

    geoffpreston
    Participant

    My daughter has electric radiator central heating (not storage radiators, but oil filled) but with the most horrible controller/timer you’ve ever seen. All radiators are wired on the same ring and connected by a switched fused spur. If LWRF produced a controllable version then each radiator could be controlled individually via a the LWRF app. All I need is a LWRF switches fused spur. Anytime soon?

    #12998
     Node Zero says:

    Node Zero
    Participant

    All I need is a LWRF switches fused spur. Anytime soon?

    Doubtful, but the solution already exists in the form of a relay controlling a contactor that switches the entire heating circuit. Or soon you can buy http://www.lampspecs.co.uk/Lighting-Accessories/Heating-Controls/LightwaveRF-Electric-Switch-White-JSJSLW934 and use one on each radiator.
    :)

    #12999
     geoffpreston says:

    geoffpreston
    Participant

    Thanks, but I don’t think this is the answer. Or at least not the best solution. Having a single controller to switch all radiators on or off is rather like having one light switch to control all the lights in the house. With individual switched spurs you can turn individual radiators on and off at different times. Precisely what LWRF are doing with their forthcoming (GasCH) heating control system.

    #13001
     Node Zero says:

    Node Zero
    Participant

    Having a single controller on a LW timer assumes that each radiator has its own adjustable thermostat and was suggested to replace the ugly timer you referred to. The product in the link is pretty much a spur unit with the added control of a room stat, ideal for your application.
    :) :) :)

    #13002
     geoffpreston says:

    geoffpreston
    Participant

    Every radiator does have it’s own built in adjustable thermostat and a cable coming out of the bottom of the radiator unit which goes to a switched fused spur. Individual radiators can be switched on and off by flipping the switch on the switched fused spur. If the six switched fused spurs (one per radiator plus one for the electric heated towel rail) were replaced with LWRF switched fused spurs then each of the radiators could be controlled individually and the timer (which is ugly, unreliable, limited in functionality and not easy to use due to control buttons being less that 3mm diameter and very close together) could be discarded. Then LWRF timers could control the heat in each room individually so they could come on at different times (or not at all) depending on personal lifestyle. NB these are not storage heaters but wall mounted electrically heated oil filled radiators of the type that are almost always fitted to new-build flat/apartment complexes where gas is not available. The market must be huge.

    #13003
     skiv71 says:

    skiv71
    Participant

    I’ve seen that unit in the flesh…

    It should function as if it were a TRV (but for electrical heating) with local temp sensing and setpoint.

    I assume from here, the wifilink can control it (on/off and setpoint) with schedules.

    For the definitive answer, we’ll have to wait till its release :)

    developer of BMS Link (http://linode.bmslink.co.uk). A cloud based Home Automation platform for LightwaveRF, Z-Wave, RFXCOM.
    #13004
     Node Zero says:

    Node Zero
    Participant

    Like I say Geoff, the solution exists. Rather than have one relay controlling the whole circuit, each rad could have its own 3kw relay and be independently controlled by LW timers.

    #16617
     robhurd says:

    robhurd
    Participant

    A fused spur switch is also something I would like added to the range of products.

    I also have a requirement for non-fused spur switches which are a requirement for sockets above certain heights (disabled access). I fully understand that the product can be remotely controlled, but we always have to consider the manual operation above all other remote features.

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