Help Identifying Master/Slave Wiring

LightwaveRF Community: Welcome Forums Installation and Troubleshooting Help Identifying Master/Slave Wiring

This topic contains 12 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Chris 8 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #10008
     SpannerBracket says:

    SpannerBracket
    Participant

    Hi,

    I’ve got a room with two ceiling lights, and two twin gang light switches. On each gang, each switch controls one of the ceiling lights. Attached is a picture of the wiring. I don’t know which wires go between the two back boxes. I want to put lightwaverf switches in place of these.

    How do I identify what is a master socket and what is a slave socket?

    Thanks,
    SpannerBracket

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    #10021
     windoze says:

    windoze
    Participant

    Firstly let me say I am no expert on Lightwave kit having only a couple of weeks experience with it. I am not sure if anyone will be able to help you just from the images you have sent as there is generally no standard between installers as to which colour means what in house lighting wiring. The good new is that either back box can be used as the master socket as you just wire the master and slave in parallel. If you are going to use the wifi controller at any point I would put the master closest to that. Someone else may be able to correct me but I don’t think the slaves have a radio receiver in them.
    You will need to use a multimeter and find which is the live feed to the switches and the wire that returns to neutral thru the lights. Please, if you are not experienced at working on mains wiring get someone who is to do this, it will kill you if you get it wrong when testing.
    You will then have to find out for each switch which three wires run from run between the back boxes, ensure they are isolated from the rest of the house wiring and there is nothing strange in the wiring. Then just follow the wiring diagram that comes with the light switches.

    Good luck

    Windoze

    #10030
     SpannerBracket says:

    SpannerBracket
    Participant

    Thanks Windoze – that makes perfect sense. I haven’t done extensive wiring, but I’ve done enough to be safe. You’ve given me enough to get myself sorted!

    #10032
     Chris says:

    Chris
    Key Master

    Disclaimer: I am not a qualified electrician. Take advice/back off if you are not confident. I managed to drill through a power cable the other week. Take that as a warning…

    The good news is is that by virtue of the fact that there appears to be three wires running between the switches, that the use of LWRF masters and slaves is supported. The bad news is that it looks like the circuits have been modified at some stage as the there are wires to both two versions of BS7671 (the wiring regs). You have the old style Red, Yellow and Blue and the new style Brown, Gray, Black and Blue.

    The three core and earth is likely joined somewhere between the two switches. You need to identify which wire in one switch leads to which wire in the other. If you can do that and prove conclusively that you have three connections between each switch, then wiring the rest up will be a doddle. To help in the future (and any future home owner) pick one end (preferably the new standard wiring colour end) and when you have identified each wire at the other end, colour code it the same using some insulating tape.

    Chris Mills Founder and Editor - LightwaveRF Community http://cpmills.com/ http://lightwaverfcommunity.org.uk
    #10034
     Davey says:

    Davey
    Participant

    You really shouldnt be tinkering with your wiring unless you are part p approved

    #10036
     Justin says:

    Justin
    Participant

    You really shouldnt be tinkering with your wiring unless you are part p approved

    There was no mention that the room is a kitchen or bathroom.

    Wifi link, plug in adapter's, wall and mood switches. Heating controls sometime?? We'll see. Lol
    #10044
     Davey says:

    Davey
    Participant

    You think part p only applies to kitchens and bathrooms and you can do what ever you want any where else with no training or testing of circuits. Sigh…….ok you carry on

    #10057
     ScubyD says:

    ScubyD
    Participant

    You think part p only applies to kitchens and bathrooms and you can do what ever you want any where else with no training or testing of circuits. Sigh…….ok you carry on

    Nothing saying you shouldn’t have training (or “education” as I’d rather call it, but it doesn’t need to be anything formal, just enough not to kill yourself / someone else / burn down your house) but there is absolutely no requirement to be Part P approved to change a light switch in your own home!

    #10060
     Davey says:

    Davey
    Participant

    Whats your back ground in electrics.. well I know enough not to kill anyone or burn my house down. Hum…..

    #10062
     Node Zero says:

    Node Zero
    Participant

    Yes, to the unskilled or ‘hard of thinking’ electricity can be dangerous but electricity has been around longer that the Part P regs and we all survived perfectly well without it. (Personally I reckon its just another way of getting a couple of grand out of sparkies for test gear etc so they can charge us £65 for changing a light switch!) I’m all for removing the safety labels from everything in an effort to cull the stupidity epidemic. JK.
    I can honestly admit I have never tested a socket or lighting circuit that I’ve fitted other than with a handy hair dryer or whatever and I’ve never had a problem. Ever. Its just about being sensible. If you don’t know what you’re doing either learn or get someone in who does.

    #10067
     ScubyD says:

    ScubyD
    Participant

    Sorry to go off topic a bit with this Part P thing, but…

    The reason it annoys me when you get people saying that you should be trained to do this, and qualified to do that, etc (especially when that’s not true) is that those qualifications are largely meaningless. Someone could do 4+ years of electronic engineering at uni, might design and build complex electronics for a living, could have been the lead designer for a nuclear power station, but none of that automatically means that they would necessarily have done the meaningless (unless they want to be an electrician) paperwork which allows them to sign off things which do require Part P approval (which, as a reminder, this job certainly doesn’t)!

    I’d much sooner trust my electrics to someone with a background in electronics (for example) who actually understands how and why all of this electrical stuff works, than someone who proved that they knew not to connect the brown wire to the yellow stripey wire, and knew which end of the wire cutters to hold on to, which got them a certificate from the council.

    #10072
     markk says:

    markk
    Participant

    I agree. The LWRF stuff is sold as retrofit with instructions. Anyone with a decent amount of common sense and the ability to follow instructions shouldn’t kill themselves installing it. It wouldn’t pretend that I could retire a whole house but the skills involved here are quite within many peoples capabilities. You are as unlikely to be messing about with light switches before shutting off the power as you are jumping into a bath before checking the water temperature.

    Running LWRF dimmer switches and plug sockets with a wifi link and iPhone app. Also now playing with RFXCom with Domoticz running on windows.
    #10078
     Chris says:

    Chris
    Key Master

    Agreed on all points. Part P certification is assurance that a contractor you employ should know what they are doing. My understanding (and happy to be corrected) is that it is not (unlike Gas Safe registration) a legal requirement to hold a Part P registration to carry out certain electrical works in certain rooms, but you will be breaking local authority building regulations (i.e. not the law) if you do not have those works checked by a ‘competent person’ once they are complete.

    Blowing my light circuit with a drill was a stupid mistake but in my defence the cable turned 90 degrees underneath the plaster and I hit what I thought was a horizontal cable on a vertical run. Where was Part P when that was fitted?

    When I’ve fitted or changed mains sockets, I’ve always used a socket tester and I would urge others to do the same.

    Bottom line: If you aren’t happy doing it yourself, don’t! Nothing on this site should lead anyone to do anything that they are not happy doing or legally shouldn’t!

    Chris Mills Founder and Editor - LightwaveRF Community http://cpmills.com/ http://lightwaverfcommunity.org.uk
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